Friday, July 10, 2015

A Deed Example of a Darned Record

An important aspect of genealogy is the evaluation of evidence. Here’s an example for you to noodle on.

Pictured below is portions of a deed published by FamilySearch with title citation:

Citation: "Idaho, Gem County Records, 1877-1962," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-909-48664-1458-86 : accessed 3 July 2015), Land and property records > Deed record, vol 2, 1866-1901 > image 2 of 598; Gem County Clerk and Recorder's Office, Emmett.

What aspects of this record would lead you to believe that it is reliable? What aspects of this record would lead you to believe it is perhaps, not the best of evidence. How would you proceed? (If this copy is too small, click to see it on the FamilySearch website.)

Port of a Gem County, Idaho deed
Port of a Gem County, Idaho deed
Port of a Gem County, Idaho deed

Post a comment for all to see. (I would rather you not reply by email.)

7 comments:

  1. What you have here is a TRANSCRIPTION of the original record. The original source record is cited. I would want to get that original source record and read it myself, to make certain the transcription is correct.

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  2. Kansas Quilter
    This is a transcript not the original. I also want to see the original to check this.

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  3. Need to try to find original deed since the citation is for a different county (Gem) than the deed (Ada). Also the dates are bad: "Gem County Records 1877-1962"; "Deed Record vol 2 1866-1901"; transcript shows deed dated June 28, 1863 in Idaho City, Boise County. Deed purportedly signed by grantor March 8, 1865, signed by Justice of the Peace March 8, no year given. 4 conflicting dates, 3 conflicting counties - good luck locating the actual original.

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  4. Idaho City is the county seat of Boise Co where the record is held with that record's date being on 29 June 1863. The will was made on 8 March 1865 and recorded on 13 March 1865.

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  5. Typewriters came into common use in the 1880s.

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  6. I'd actually start by looking at the relevant law, as this deed has been copied several times. It was copied into the deed book of Gem County from the deed book of Canyon County, one of the parent counties of Gem. It was previously copied into the deed book of Canyon County from the deed book of Ada County, one of the parent counties of Canyon. It was originally presented to the Recorder of Ada County to be copied into the deed book there, but the original transaction occurred in 1863 in the original county of Boise, before Ada County was formed out of Boise. Did Idaho law once require that the deeds of properties located in newly formed counties be copied out of the books of the parent county or counties it was formed from?

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  7. Excellent opportunity to learn! Great find!

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