Thursday, June 12, 2008

FamilySearch Indexing tip: Account for all the bumps

"Account for all the bumps" is a shorthand way of saying that all the bumps, strokes and dots could theoretically match the letters you have in mind.

As you try to figure out what a word or name might be, try and account for all the bumps. Different letters have a different number of bumps. A lowercase m has 3 while n has 2. Lowercase u, v, x, y also have 2. Sometimes lowercase a and o appear to have 2. Lowercase e, i, j, l, r, s and t all have 1 bump. Often, there isn't a lot of difference among some letters. My point is, if the bumps don't fit, you must a... er... you must reconsider.

Let's look at an example. The word in the illustration below gave me problems.

This word gave me problems.

Put a check mark in front of each of the following choices that you think account for all the bumps. Don't worry that these aren't real words.

Einsbin

Enelein

Euirlim

Emeliur

Let's look at another example.

Here's another example.

Which of the following account for all the bumps. Again, don't worry that these aren't real words.

M@Kemir

McKeizir

In closing, "account for all the bumps" is really just a shorthand way of saying that all the bumps, strokes and dots could theoretically match the letters you have in mind.

So, what do you think the two words are? Leave me a comment with your answer. Next week I'll give my answers. Stayed tuned.

6 comments:

  1. Emeline and McKenzie.

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  2. I also think the names are Emeline and McKenzie, but "accounting for all the bumps" I would have to say Emelinr and MxcKenzir. They are pretty clear.

    The person who wrote this had several different ways to write the lower case e - the open e (like a script capital E) and the ending e which looks like a lower case r.

    Cheers -- Randy

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  3. Definitely "Emeline" and "McKenzie". Those "z"s can be tricky if you're not used to them ;-)

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  4. Emeline and Mckenzie. I am pretty sure I accounted for all of the bumps.

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  5. Emeline & McKenzie but I can see how you came up with the other solutions. When in doubt, go with the common name rather than an obscure name, especially common names from that era.

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